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6 Easy Campfires Everyone Should Know How To Make

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6 Easy Campfires Everyone Should Know How To MakeThis week’s video comes from the Youtube channel, Canadian Prepper, which I can’t recommend enough. In this video, he goes over the six basic types of campfires and their uses.

He also talks about the basics of building a fire in winter. As a general rule, any fire built on the snow requires a foundation of pine boughs or leaves to insulate the fire from the snow. Otherwise, the fire will go out as the snow melts under the fire.

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With that being said, let’s build some fires.

1. The Tepee Fire

The Tepee fire is the most intuitive design using bigger sticks on the outside and smaller, little sticks on the inside with the kindling right in the middle.

The main drawback is that it doesn’t burn long but the other fires we’ll explore can solve that and the Tepee fire is actually used as the catalyst to start most of the other fires with the exception of the next one.

2. The Canadian Candle

This is also known as the Swedish Fire Torch. It’s basically a large, single log stood on end that is either split into quarters with an axe or has grooves cut as a crisscross from the top down with a chainsaw.

Tinder is put into the cracks to get it started and the opposing sides radiate the heat to create a fire that continues to burn for a surprisingly long time. Here are some of the pros and cons of the Canadian Candle:

Pros

  • No maintenance
  • Best for cooking
  • Long burning
  • Efficient

 Cons

  • Requires tools to make the cuts
  • Longer setup
  • Harder to light
  • Requires good tinder
  • You need a large log
  • Radiates less heat for warmth

3. The Top-Down Fire

This fire is exactly what it says and is a low maintenance fire. It’s ideal for winter in deep snow because the construction of the fire insulates it from the snow. You start with the largest logs on the bottom and then gradually crisscross smaller logs and sticks stacked up as you go.

The sticks get smaller and smaller until you get to the top where you build a small tepee fire with your tinder. As the fire burns it travels down into the larger and larger logs. Here are the pros and cons.

Pros

  • Only medium difficulty to setup
  • Low maintenance
  • Easier lighting
  • Works on snowy or wet ground

Cons

  • Requires tools to make the cuts in the log
  • Takes a little time to setup

4. The Log Cabin Fire

This is another fire that looks like it sounds and is a bit of a novelty fire. You build a tepee fire and then surround it with sticks and split wood which is stacked up in a square like the logs in a log cabin.

It burns hot but burns fast. Here are the pros and cons.

Pros

  • Nice looking fire
  • High heat output

Cons

  • Requires tools to split the wood
  • Somewhat longer setup
  • You need good, straight wood
  • Burns fast
  • Somewhat of a novelty

5. The Star Fire

Again, this fire looks like it sounds. Logs are placed around a tepee fire with their ends jutting into the fire. As the fire burns, the logs are pushed into the center to make it self-sustaining. Here are the pros and cons.

Pros

  • Long burning
  • Easy lighting
  • Easy setup

Cons

  • Lower heat
  • Need a dry platform
  • May require tools

6. The Lean-To Fire

This fire is a stack of sticks leaned against a large log. You start a tepee fire next to the log and the sticks are placed over the fire leaning against the log.

Pros

  • Easy and fast setup
  • Good survival fire
  • Log radiates heat

Cons

  • Burns fast
  • Highly directional heat

It’s a little difficult to explain what these campfires look like, so be sure to watch the video below to see each fire demonstrated, and don’t forget to check out the Youtube channel, Canadian Prepper.

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1 Comment

  1. Kevin B Palmer on March 7, 2020 at 1:00 pm

    Good stuff the only thing I would mention is that blow straw you have being aluminum that could stick to your lip in cold winter and be a problem if it did! one should mention having some tape or surgical rubber on the end etc where youd insert it into your mouth hope this helps!

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