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    It’s Not Over: 5 Reasons Why The Next Wave May Be Worse

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    It's Not Over: 5 Reasons Why The Next Wave May Be Worse

    Although the number of COVID-19 cases and deaths continue to rise, there are indications that we have flattened the curve. This shows that the steps we've taken are slowly but surely having an effect on this fight against coronavirus.

    The world faces pandemics so infrequently that it’s difficult to fully comprehend their effect. However, history has taught us that illnesses like this don’t simply disappear. They continue to circle the Earth with wave after wave until humans collectively develop some antigens to the virus and slow the rate of transmission.

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    The Spanish Flu of 1918

    The second wave of the Spanish Flu of 1918 was more deadly than the first. So we can surmise that the second wave of the coronavirus may be even deadlier than the first.

    Fortunately, just knowing and accepting this fact can help you prepare better for subsequent waves of this virus. If history holds true, this current pandemic will loom like a shadow over the Earth for the next two years.

    In the video below, City Prepping shares five reasons the next wave could be worse. Here they are:

    1. It’s not going to disappear and go away. The primary reason is that the virus is easily transmissible which makes stopping it almost impossible.

    Succeeding waves will create herd immunity, but the Spanish flu had frequent waves before it ended as a pandemic in late 1919.

    2. Vaccines take time and are difficult to create. It also will not create 100% immunity from the virus. The timetable for rolling out a new vaccine is 12 to 18 months. What makes the coronavirus particularly challenging is that it is mutating.

    As a result, a vaccine may be designed for one version of the virus but will not defend against a mutated version. Researchers then have to modify their vaccine and this takes more time.

    3. Governments don’t coordinate efforts well. Many governments have taken specific steps to forestall the spread of the coronavirus from lockdowns to social distancing. But some governments have either not taken these steps or have taken them in a limited way.

    Individuals in many countries have also chosen to ignore recommended steps which will cause the virus to continue to spread. And that gets to number 4.

    4. Some communities and individuals don’t take it seriously. This is a significant reason the virus will continue to spread and why the second wave will be worse.

    As people grow tired of lockdowns and shuttered stores, they rebel. And the unwillingness to heed the common-sense precautions fuels the spread of the disease.

    5. It’s not too late to prepare for the second wave of the pandemic. If the coronavirus behaves like the Spanish flu, the second wave will occur in the fall of 2020.

    Governments will no doubt implement past protocols to control the spread, but governments take time to act. That’s why you should prepare:

    • Begin to store non-perishable food.
    • Learn gardening and plant a robust garden.
    • Purchase and store personal protective equipment

    For a more detailed discussion of the second wave of coronavirus, be sure to watch the video below.

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